Wood & Associates: Attorneys At Law

Parenting Time

Protect Your Right to Parenting Time

If you’re involved in a child custody case and want to be sure your rights as a parent are protected, make sure you have a knowledgeable attorney by your side. We know the ins-and-outs of the local legal system and will fight to secure your parenting rights. 

Michigan law states that it is in the best interest of a child to have a strong relationship with both parents. Our attorneys will provide sound legal counsel as you work to establish a parenting schedule that best works for the needs of your child, yourself, and your former partner. We’ll do everything we can to maximize your time with your children and keep their best interests in mind throughout the legal process. 

Once you’ve made your decision, we’ll appeal to the judge on your behalf to make the order legally binding.

Schedule an appointment today to see what we can do for you.

I can't say enough about how above and beyond Brigette Booser went for our family when we were in need of her legal counsel. She was very professional, compassionate, attentive, and incredibly intelligent."

Jim Bunn

Questions you may be asking:

Parenting Time is the actual schedule of days and times each parent will be responsible for the care of the children. Custody, particularly, Legal Custody, refers to the idea that when there are major and important decisions regarding the care, health, education of the children, both parents must agree on such decisions.

This depends on the county in which your parenting time is under and how far away “out of state” actually means. If you are the non-custodial parent (children with the other parent most of the time), then the schedule usually includes extended parenting time for most of the summer breaks, usually every spring break, alternate Thanksgiving holiday, and share Christmas/Winter Break equally.  There are often times provisions for cell phones, video chat, etc.

You do not have to have a parenting time order. Our office would always recommend that there be a parenting time order in place just in case the parties have an argument or dispute that breaks down the co-parenting relationship. The most common time this happens, and is usually temporary, is when one of the parties enters a new romantic relationship.